Boobquake strikes Southeast Asia

0426boobs

The wonderful Boobquake experiment officially started today, and it looks like it has already garnered one result. Earlier this morning, a major earthquake shook Taiwan and the Philippines, as thousands of woman around the world bared their cleavage to test one Islamic cleric’s theory that scantily clad women cause earthquakes. Coincidence? Or proof of the supernatural power of cleavage?

Fortunately, no damage or casualties have yet been reported in the 6.9 magnitude quake that struck off the southeast coast of Taiwan, but the news might have some Boobquakers reaching for a shawl. One of the event’s supporters on Facebook wrote, “I’m starting to think I should go cover up.”

Boobquake was created by American blogger Jen McCreight to satirize the claim made by Islamic cleric and, apparently, amateur scientist Hojatoleslam Kazem Sedighi that immodest female clothing is to blame for earthquakes.

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The day Einstein died

LIFE.com has an article about a photographer and his pictures on the day that Albert Einstein died in Princeton.

Einstein desk
Albert Einstein, the genius physicist whose theories changed our ideas of how the universe works, died 55 years ago, on April 18, 1955, of heart failure. He was 76. His funeral and cremation were intensely private affairs, and only one photographer managed to capture the events of that extraordinary day: LIFE magazine’s Ralph Morse. Armed with his camera and a case of scotch — to open doors and loosen tongues — Morse compiled a quietly intense record of an icon’s passing. But aside from one now-famous image (above), the pictures Morse took that day were never published. At the request of Einstein’s son, who asked that the family’s privacy be respected while they mourned, LIFE decided not to run the full story, and for 55 years Morse’s photographs lay unseen and forgotten. Pictured: Ralph Morse’s photograph of Einstein’s office in Princeton, taken hours after Einstein’s death and captured exactly as the Nobel Prize-winner had left it.

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The Scream: A radar image shows the crater of Eyjafjallajokull in southeast Iceland

Volcano face

A radar image of the volcanic crater appears to show a nightmarish face, which is reminiscent of Edvard Munch’s painting ‘The Scream.’ Coincidentally, it is thought that the masterpiece was inspired by the blood red skies caused by the powerful volcanic eruption of Krakatoa in 1883.

In his diary Mr Munch wrote: ‘I was walking along a path with two friends – the sun was setting – suddenly the sky turned blood red – I paused, feeling exhausted, and leaned on the fence – there was blood and tongues of fire above the blue-black fjord and the city – my friends walked on, and I stood there trembling with anxiety – and I sensed an infinite scream passing through nature.’

The picture was taken by the ELTA radar from an Icelandic Coast Guard airplane.

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7,500 Online Shoppers Unknowingly Sold Their Souls

A computer game retailer revealed that it legally owns the souls of thousands of online shoppers, thanks to a clause in the terms and conditions agreed to by online shoppers.

The retailer, British firm GameStation, added the “immortal soul clause” to the contract signed before making any online purchases earlier this month. It states that customers grant the company the right to claim their soul.

“By placing an order via this Web site on the first day of the fourth month of the year 2010 Anno Domini, you agree to grant Us a non transferable option to claim, for now and for ever more, your immortal soul. Should We wish to exercise this option, you agree to surrender your immortal soul, and any claim you may have on it, within 5 (five) working days of receiving written notification from gamesation.co.uk or one of its duly authorised minions.”

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Handyman injured in ‘Laurel and Hardy’ incident

LadderPeter Aspinall, 64, had been asked to prune a sycamore tree in the grounds of a hotel, but instead of leaning his ladder against the trunk he placed it against the branch he was hacking down.

When the branch fell it took Mr Aspinall with it, 14ft to the ground below. He broke his heel, damaged his ligaments and had to spend ten days in hospital recovering from surgery on his injuries.

Now Mr Aspinall, who had worked at the Egerton House Hotel near Bolton, Lancashire, for just two weeks, is suing them for compensation.

He took the action after health and safety inspectors concluded the hotel failed to carry out a risk assessment on the dangers of pruning.

They also said that his employer should have given him training on where to place the ladder.

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