10 reasons to adopt an older dog

Dogs

1. Older dogs are housetrained. You won’t have to go through the difficult stage(s) of teaching a puppy house manners and mopping/cleaning up after accidents.

2. Older dogs are not teething puppies, and won’t chew your shoes and furniture while growing up.

3. Older dogs can focus well because they’ve mellowed. Therefore, they learn quickly.

4. Older dogs have learned what “no” means. If they hadn’t learned it, they wouldn’t have gotten to be “older” dogs.

5. Older dogs settle in easily, because they’ve learned what it takes to get along with others and become part of a pack.

6. Older dogs are good at giving love, once they get into their new, loving home. They are grateful for the second chance they’ve been given.

7. What You See Is What You Get: Unlike puppies, older dogs have grown into their shape and personality. Puppies can grow up to be quite different from what they seemed at first.

8. Older dogs are instant companions, ready for hiking, car trips, and other things you like to do.

9. Older dogs leave you time for yourself, because they don’t make the kinds of demands on your time and attention that puppies and young dogs do.

10. Older dogs let you get a good night’s sleep because they’re accustomed to human schedules and don’t generally need nighttime feedings, comforting, or bathroom breaks.

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Beer bellies linked to Alzheimers

Beer bellyA study of more than 700 adults showed that being overweight is associated with smaller brain volume, a factor linked with dementia.

The finding was particularly strong in those with high levels of visceral fat – fatty tissue which sits around the organs, Annals of Neurology reported.

More than 750,000 people in the UK have a form of dementia.

The researchers from Boston University School of Medicine looked at people with an average age of 60 years old, 70% of whom were women.

They measured body mass index, waist circumference and used scans to look at the amount of abdominal fat.

The results showed that as BMI increased, brain volume decreased – a finding that has been reported in other studies.

But the findings also showed a closer connection between abdominal fat and the risk of dementia.

The link between visceral fat around the central organs and smaller brain volume was independent of overall weight.

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Workers drop 100 year-old statue

This is the moment workers tried to move a 100-year-old statue – and dropped it!

Footage of the Belgian crew’s disastrous attempt to move the monument appeared on YouTube yesterday.

The film shows the workers try to lift the stone statue from it’s plinth using a hoist

But it slips through the attached guide ropes and crashes to the ground, breaking into pieces in the process.

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Thanks Janet

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How spitting cobras shoot for the eyes

Spitting_cobraBruce Young from the University of Massachusetts is antagonising a spitting cobra. He approaches, keeping outside of the snake’s strike radius, while moving his head from side to side. The cobra doesn’t like it and erects its hood in warning. Young persists, and the snake retaliates by launching twin streams of venom at him from forward-facing holes in its fangs. The aim is spot-on: right at Young’s eyes. Fortunately, he is wearing a Perspex visor that catches the spray; without it, the venom would start destroying his corneas, giving him minutes to seek medical aid before permanent blindness set in.

But, how does the cobra do that?  Read on.

The rest of the story

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Dolphins evolved from land animals…

…predators resembling wolves.

When most people think of evolution they picture fish sprouting legs and walking on land. Dolphins don’t give a crap what most people think. They’ve seen land and had legs and decided all that was for sissies. No, the dolphin’s level of badassery was far too great to be restricted by gravity. And since air is basically just an incredibly more boring version of water, the dolphin chose to evolve back into a sea creature and see what chaos it could unleash in the murky depths of the scary, unforgiving ocean.

Dolphin embryo
As you can see from the picture above, all four limbs are still quite visible in the dolphin’s embryonic stage.

More interesting facts about dolphins

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