18 thoughts on “Kid falls out of car

  1. This is why we use child lock doors and car seats in America. Someone should have scooped up that kid and never returned it. Those 2 are obviously too stupid to parent.

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  2. Why are the parents WALKING back to the child. The car stops too slowly. The parents walk too slowly. Man, I would have been out of that car so fast, the car would have kept going without me.

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  3. I don’t think the country or the race have anything to do with it. It could be lack of parenting skills or just an accident.

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  4. How did we ever survive the time of driving around in cars that didn’t have childlocks on the doors, and no seat belts in the back seat? Car goes around a corner – we all slid to one side. Around an opposite corner, we all slid to the other side of the car. Hit a bump? We bounce off the ceiling of the back seat. Or end up on the rear deck. It was fun! 🙂

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    • eyeball – sounds like the car rides I grew up with. If mom & dad had to hit the brakes quickly, they would just fling out an arm to stop us from hitting the dashboard (who needs a seatbelt?). I remember sleeping on the rear deck during long trips. It WAS fun!

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  5. When my younger sister was five or six (before seat belts) I went around a curve in the road the door opened and she fell out. I was suppose to have locked the door but forgot (teenager fail mode). I caught a world of *hit from my mom. Looking back she could have been hit if a car had been behind me. After than she always reminded me to check the lock. Some forty-five years later she still reminds me about it.

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  6. I remember we didn’t have enough seats in our van for all of us kids (7 siblings) so we had those mini kid lawn chairs in the very very back, usually where you keep the luggage. Back then we thought it was the coolest… you can’t do that these days. Or on the long road trips the cooler in the middle was the best seat.

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  7. Growing up, life was a lesson in physics, especially in the car. Newton’s laws of inertia and motion were familiar concepts after sliding in the back seat of the family sedan or station wagon. The laws of thermodynamics and heat transfer were learned on those same vinyl seats in the blaze of the summer sun. We chased bugs with magnifying glasses and yes, even burned ants, while learning about optics and solar energy. We crawled in the dirt with steel Tonka trucks, rode the swings, metal slides (more thermodynamics there … ouch), and the old, metal playground merry-go-rounds and learned the lessons of centrifugal force. We played with a yo-yo, a Wheel-o, real wood Linkin’ Logs, and a metal Slinky, skates, and skate boards.

    Somehow we survived it all. We learned to interact with the physical world around us and the rules of engagement when dealing with that world. We learned balance, timing, and, compassion (for the burnt ants), and, most importantly, that we can’t fly like Superman no matter how high you swing.

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  8. Almost forgot the video .. I fell out of a car once. Broke an arm, but didn’t land on my heard (contrary to what others might think). It wasn’t anything like this video. I was 11 and it was my fault (another lesson learned).

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  9. That happened to me when I was a kid. We had a 73 Volvo wagon and I didn’t close the door to the second click. When we hit a turn, the door flew open and out I rolled. It was scarier for me than in this video though, as when I sat up all I could see was a license plate coming to a stop about a foot from my face.

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  10. The only fault I can see with the parents is that they seem to have forgotten to teach their kid the ol’ “Tuck and roll” move. Very important!

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